Helpful Articles

Helpful Articles

Helpful Articles

Helpful Articles

Ocusoft
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Soft Multifocal Contact Lenses

After age 40, the ability of our focusing system decreases a little every year. In most cases, it is necessary to support our focusing system with a separate prescription for making tasks like computer work, reading text messages and small print more comfortable. For contact lens wearers, it is possible to correct both distance and near vision in a multifocal contact lens. If you are interested in being glasses-free for most of the day, consult with your doctor to see if multifocals are a good option for you. 


Optical Coherence Tomography

Optical Coherence Tomography is a non-invasive imaging test that may be performed as a standard part of your regular, comprehensive exams, or you may be able to request this test as an addition to your usual exam.
 

Optical Coherence Tomography uses light waves to take cross-section images of your retina, which is the area of light-sensitive cells at the back of your eye that is responsible for receiving light and transmitting it into messages that are sent up to the brain. The technology behind OCT enables your eye doctor to see each of the different layers that make up the retina. By being able to see these and measure them, they can obtain a much clearer picture of the overall health and condition of your eyes.
 

Why are Optical Coherence Tomography scans important?

When you choose to have an OCT scan at fairly regular intervals, such as during your normal comprehensive eye exams, your eye doctor can compare newer results to previous ones. This helps them to build up a picture of the health of your eyes, and spot any changes which may be concerning, early, before they cause symptoms or have a permanent effect on your vision. 
 

Anyone can have an OCT scan, but they are particularly recommended for patients over the age of 25 who are concerned about the health of their eyes, or who are at risk of or already have diabetes, glaucoma or a family history of eye disease. This is because they can be used to spot the early signs of a range of eye diseases, including glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, disorders of the optic nerve and more – even before you realize that you are affected.
 

What happens during an Optical Coherence Tomography scan?

An OCT scan is a quick, painless experience. To prepare you, your eye doctor may require you to have eyedrops that will dilate your pupils and make it easier to see your retina. This means that the scanner will get clearer, more concise images. You’ll be asked to sit in front of the OCT machine where you will rest your head against a support to help you sit perfectly still. As you stare ahead, the equipment will perform the scan of your eyes. There is no contact with your eyes whatsoever, you will just need to sit still, with your eyes open as much as possible during the process, which usually takes less than 10 minutes. The images will be sent digitally to your eye doctor for them to assess immediately and stored digitally on your personal record.
 

There’s no downtime after an OCT scan, but if you have had your eyes dilated you may find that you are particularly sensitive to light for a few hours afterwards. This occurs because the pupils remain wider and therefore able to let more light in that usual.
 

If you would like to find out more about Optical Coherence Tomography, don’t hesitate to speak to our professional eyecare team.


Upneeq

Upneeq is the first FDA-approved topical treatment for low-lying lids.
Low-lying eyelids can affect your appearance and decrease your field of vision. Now with Upneeq, patients can reclaim an alert and vibrant appearance, while improving their field of vision simultaneously. Whether you want a little lift for everyday use, photography sessions, or a little midday pick-me-up- Upneeq can help! Consult with your doctor to see if Upneeq would be a good treatment option for you.


Specialty Contact Lenses

Every patient is different and so are their eyes. This means that there need to be different types of contact lenses to suit each individual. Some patients have corneal abnormalities which mean that conventional lenses won’t sit comfortably on the surface of their eyes, while others suffer from eye conditions that mean normal contact lenses won’t be comfortable or could irritate their eyes. 

As you may have guessed from the name, specialty contact lenses are unconventional contacts that are designed for patients that regular contacts might not be suitable. Here are some of the main types of speciality contact lenses and who they are recommended for. 
 

Who might be a good patient for specialty contact lenses?

Some of the patients that might benefit from specialty contact lenses include those who:

  • have been diagnosed with dry eye syndrome

  • have corneal scarring

  • have been diagnosed with keratoconus, a condition characterized by the bulging of the cornea

  • suffer from strabismus, a condition where the patient has an eye that turns in or out relative to the other

  • have suffered an injury to the eye

  • suffer from a peripheral corneal thinning disorder

  • are intolerant to other types of lenses


Your eye doctor or contact lens provider will be able to tell you if you need specialty contact lenses and if so, which lenses would be best based on your individual requirements. 
 

Rigid Gas-Permeable Lenses

Also known as RGP lenses, these are made from a special material that allows oxygen to pass through them and reach the surface of the eyes. This helps to keep the eyes hydrated and comfortable, making these lenses easier to wear, especially for patients who suffer from dry eyes. Dry eyes aren’t just a symptom, but a very real condition, characterized by dry, stiff, and uncomfortable eyes, blurred vision, and eye fatigue. RGP lenses are more rigid than soft lenses, and this helps to keep them stable and secure on the eyes so that patients can enjoy sharper vision. They also help the cornea to maintain its shape, which helps to minimize the effects of some corneal abnormalities. 
 

Scleral Contact Lenses

Scleral contact lenses are very different to standard contact lenses. This is because scleral lenses are much larger in diameter, with three different sizes available depending on your specific needs. This size difference means that the edges of the contact lens fall on a white part of the eye, called the sclera rather than the cornea. Scleral lenses are also different in that they vault over the surface of the cornea rather than touching it, leaving a space between the front surface of the eye and the back of the contact lens. This makes scleral lenses a good choice for patients with dry eyes and corneal abnormalities. Space can trap tear film which keeps the eyes hydrated, while space also accommodates many corneal abnormalities, such as the bulge associated with keratoconus. 
 

Hybrid Contact Lenses

Hybrid contact lenses are a combination of both soft and gas-permeable contact lenses, giving patients the opportunity to enjoy the best parts of both designs. The middle part of hybrid lenses is made from gas-permeable material that lets oxygen pass through to the eyes. However, the gas-permeable part of the lens is more rigid, and this firmer center gives the lens greater stability and the patient enhanced clarity. The RGP portion of the lens also helps to trap a tear film between the cornea and the lens so that the eye remains hydrated. Meanwhile, the outer edge of hybrid lenses is a soft lens skirt. This means that patients don’t have to deal with the hard edges associated with RGP lenses that may be uncomfortable. Instead, the comfort levels that patients experience are more like wearing fully soft lenses. 

For more information about specialty contact lenses, don’t hesitate to speak to our dedicated eye care team. 


Visual Field

Visual field testing is an important part of most standard comprehensive eye exams. Also sometimes known as perimetry testing, Visual field testing is a method to measure the entire scope of vision of an individual, including their peripheral/side vision.
 

The importance of visual field testing

Visual field testing is one of the most effective diagnostic treatments in the detection of glaucoma. This is because when patients are affected by glaucoma, it is usually the peripheral vision that is affected by their condition first. However, it can also be used to detect central or peripheral retinal diseases, eyelid conditions such as drooping, optic nerve damage and conditions that affect the visual pathways from the optic nerve to the area of the brain where this information is processed into vision.
 

Visual field testing is also an important part of monitoring for people who are considered to be at risk for vision loss from disease and other problems, including those who have been diagnosed with the following:

  • Multiple sclerosis

  • Hyperthyroidism

  • Pituitary gland disorders

  • Central nervous system problems (such as a tumor that may be pressing on the brain)

  • Stroke

  • Diabetes

  • High blood pressure
     

What to expect from visual field testing

Visual field testing is non-invasive, painless and doesn’t require patients to have their eyes dilated. You will be positioned in a dome-like machine, looking through one eye at a time while a series of small lights flash in your side vision. Every time you see a light, you will press a button on a hand-held remote-like device.  Some of the lights will be bright, some will be dim, and you are not meant to see all of them. You will be guided through the test by a technician who will monitor to ensure the test results are as accurate as possible. 
Depending on the outcome of your results, you may be recommended for further diagnostic testing. If you have been diagnosed with glaucoma, you will probably be recommended to have several visual field tests each year, which will help your eye doctor to monitor the progression of your condition and recommend treatments to slow it.”

If you would like more information about visual field testing, or if you have concerns about your peripheral vision, please don’t hesitate to schedule an appointment with our experienced and knowledgeable eyecare team today.


Tonometer

A tonometer refers to the equipment that is used in tonometry – a test that measures the pressure inside your eyes, also known as intraocular pressure or IOP for short. Fortunately, tonometry can be used to detect changes in eye pressure before they cause any symptoms, enabling prompt action to be taken before your vision is affected. 
 

What to expect from tonometry testing

There are various methods of tonometry testing, but many eye doctors use either Goldmann tonometry, which is the conventional technique to measure eye pressure, or electronic tonometry.
 

Goldmann tonometry testing is carried out using the Goldmann applanation tonometer, which is attached to a slit lamp microscope. This requires anesthetic eye drops to be used which numb your eyes, before a small probe is pressed gently against the eye, indenting the cornea. The pressure that the cornea pushes back onto the tonometer is what is measured to give your IOP reading. Electronic tonometry is where a handheld, mobile device is gently and quickly applied to the cornea to check the pressure, providing an accurate reading. Some eye doctors also offer non-contact tonometry which is where a puff of air is used to flatten the cornea, although this is reported to be less accurate than the Goldmann technique.


Bruder Mask

Bruder Moist Heat Eye Compress
A CLINICALLY PROVEN AND NATURAL WAY TO TREAT CHRONIC DRY EYE, MGD AND BLEPHARITIS

The patented BRUDER Moist Heat Eye Compress helps clear oil glands and allows natural oils to flow back onto the eye to relieve discomfort.

The easy-to-use compress delivers an effective moist heat treatment. Simply microwave for 20-25 seconds and apply for 8-10 minutes or as prescribed by your doctor.

The compress helps stabilize the tear film, improves oil gland function and slows tear evaporation. Properly hydrated and lubricated eyes can expel bacteria and debris more efficiently so your eyes will feel refreshed and rejuvenated.

* Safe for frequent use
* Self-hydrating – no need to add water
* Anti-bacterial and non-allergenic
* Washable and reusable.


Blephex

Our eyes are extremely delicate, yet they can be subjected to harsh conditions and other environmental factors that affect their health. One of the problems that can affect our eyes is an accumulation of dirt, debris and bacteria on the eyelids. This can cause a range of issues, including stopping tear film from reaching the eyes and being properly dispersed over their surface – which is necessary to keep them healthy and comfortable. Fortunately, a new solution called BlephexÔ can help.

 

What is BlephexÔ?

BlephexÔ is a handheld electro-mechanical device that is applied to the margins of the eyelids with the purpose of cleaning them and improving the effectiveness with which tear film flows onto the surface of the eyes.

 

BlephexÔ has a disposable, surgical-grade sponge tip which rapidly oscillates to create a cleaning action. Before the sponge tip is placed onto the eyes, it is soaked in a gentle exfoliating solution. This solution provides soft abrasion to help remove dead skin cells and debris that could be irritating the eyes and interrupting tear film progression. The BlephexÔ device is manually applied to the eyes and moved gently across the eyelids, with the entire, painless process taking approximately 6 to 8 minutes per eye. A different sponge is used on each eye, ensuring that no bacteria is passed between them. After the procedure, patients are given instructions on how to maintain the cleanliness of their eyelids with daily/nightly eyelid hygiene at home.

 

Most patients experience a significant improvement in tear film production and dispersal, and a reduction in unpleasant symptoms that they may have been experiencing within 48 hours of their treatment. While a single treatment is normally enough to produce excellent results, many patients are advised to have BlephexÔ every 4-6 months.

 

What conditions can BlephexÔ help with?

BlephexÔ can be used to clean the eyelids at any time, and people who suffer from dry eyes or eye allergies may find it is particularly beneficial for helping to reduce the symptoms that they experience. It can also be combined with Lipiflow – another technological solution – to help counteract the effects of dry eyes.
 

Unsurprisingly, BlephexÔ is particularly recommended as a treatment for an eye condition called blepharitis. Blepharitis is characterized by the inflammation of the eyelids, which causes them to become red, swollen and itchy. Although the condition is not usually serious, it can lead to further problems if it isn’t treated.
 

Symptoms of blepharitis include:

  • Sore eyes

  • Itchy eyes

  • A gritty, irritated feeling affecting the eyes

  • Redness

  • Flakes or crustiness around the roots of the eyelashes

  • Eyelids that stick together when you wake up in the morning

 

If you are suffering from the symptoms of blepharitis, dry eyes or eye allergies and feel that you would benefit from BlephexÔ treatment, please contact our team to schedule a consultation appointment.


Types of Soft Contact Lenses

Wearing contact lenses gives patients the flexibility and freedom to live life to the fullest, without some of the difficulties presented by wearing glasses. Many people who choose contact lenses do so because they don’t like the way that glasses look or feel, or because wearing glasses compromises their ability to perform certain tasks or activities, such as sports or jobs that require the use of safety goggles. 

There are lots of different contact lenses to choose from, with two of the most popular being daily disposables and toric lenses. 
 

Disposable Lenses

As their name suggests, these daily contact lenses are disposable. This means that they can and should be discarded at the end of each day rather than re-worn. Disposable lenses do tend to be a little more expensive than some repeat-wear varieties, but the benefits usually outweigh the cost. 

Some of the advantages of choosing daily disposable contact lenses include:

  • You don’t have to clean them, which saves patients a great deal of time and hassle. It also helps save money in terms of the ongoing cost of cleaning solution. 

  • Disposable lenses are also great for people with eye allergies. This is because with ordinary lenses, there’s an opportunity for deposits and microorganisms to build up. With daily disposables, allergens have less chance to attach themselves to the lenses and cause irritation and other allergy symptoms. 

  • You don’t need to schedule regular replacements either, which makes wearing contact lenses easier on your schedule. 

  • Disposable contact lenses are particularly good for people who have busy lives and are likely to cut corners when it comes to caring for their eyes or contacts since there is no cleaning or maintenance required.


Daily disposable contact lenses are available in a wide range of prescriptions, including those for patients with nearsightedness and farsightedness. Your eye doctor will be able to advise you if you are a candidate for disposable contact lenses. 
 

Toric Lenses

Toric contact lenses are recommended for patients who have a refractive eye problem called astigmatism. Patients with astigmatism have corneal abnormalities that cause the refraction of the eye to be different between the vertical and horizontal planes, causing blurred vision and difficulty seeing fine details. Toric contact lenses are shaped in a particular way that creates the different focusing powers needed in each part of the lens to correct your vision. For this reason, it’s essential that Toric lenses are placed into the eyes in the correct position.

Fortunately, manufacturers design Toric lenses with features that help them to stay in place, including:

  • Thin/thick zones

  • Creating areas of the lens that are thicker or heavier which helps secure it in position 

  • An area where the bottom of the lens is slightly cut off 


To keep them stable, Toric lenses are a little firmer than conventional soft lenses. This means that some patients can find them a little less comfortable, but the superior vision they obtain outweighs this. Your eye doctor will be able to advise you if you are a good candidate for Toric contact lenses and which variety would best suit you. 

To find out more about daily contact lenses, speak to our friendly and knowledgeable team. 


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